A groundbreaking program to confront racism within healthcare institutions.

The COVID-19 epidemic illuminated racial disparities in healthcare delivery. Yet the truth is that inequities may permeate the medical institution itself, from workplace bias against marginalized occupations to hiring discrimination at the highest levels of clinical care. Addressing these inequities is the first step to ensuring equity in patient care.

Developed in partnership with Mass General Brigham, Facing Change is based on the true stories of healthcare workers. Facing Change tackles difficult topics around race in an accessible, informative Choose Your Own Journey™ format. With every decision, learners make individual decisions that illustrate systemic impacts.

As the writer and activist James Baldwin said, "Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced." Facing Change builds the foundations of a new medical culture, where diversity is an asset, everyone is treated with respect, and all of our healthcare heroes can thrive.

Topics

  • Understanding and addressing microaggressions

  • Improving bystander skills

  • Dismantling bias in hiring

  • Confronting discrimination against non-English speaking staff

  • Standing up to patient bias

  • Having difficult conversations around race

  • Recognizing everyone on a team, regardless of hierarchy

Methodologies

  • Scenario Modeling

  • Branching Storylines

  • Decision Points

  • Interactive Exercises

  • Assessments

Playable Characters

Dr. Timothy Carter

Carolina Jimenz, Environmental Services

Jennifer Garcia, RN

Elise Knowles and Marie Connor, Administrators

Developed in partnership with Mass General Brigham (MGB)

24% of Middle-Eastern physicians reported experiencing religious discrimination frequently over their career.

Aasim I. Padela, Huda Adam, Maha Ahmad, Zahra Hosseinian & Farr Curlin (2016) Religious identity and workplace discrimination: A national survey of American Muslim physicians, AJOB Empirical Bioethics, 7:3, 149-159, DOI: 10.1080/23294515.2015.1111271

Minority physicians are almost 30% more likely to withdraw from residency than their counterparts of white race/ethnicity and were 8 times more likely to take extended leaves of absence.

2016 National Healthcare Retention & RN Staffing Report

The average cost of turnover for a nurse ranges from $37,700 to $58,400. Hospitals can lose $5.2 million to $8.1 million annually on nurse attrition.

Baldwin DC Jr, Rowley BD, Daugherty SR, Bay RC. Withdrawal and extended leave during residency training: results of a national survey. Acad Med. 1995;70(12):1117-1124. DOI: 10.1097/00001888-199512000-00015

In 2019, 89 percent of all hospital CEOs were white (non-Hispanic or Latino) while, according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau data, 60 percent of the population is white (non-Hispanic or Latino)

2020, "Increasing and Sustaining Racial/Ethnic Diversity in Healthcare Leadership", American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE)

Healthcare workers of color were five times more likely than the general population to test positive for COVID-19. Healthcare workers of color were also more likely to report inadequate or reused PPE, at a rate 50% higher than what white workers reported. For Latinos, the rate was double that of white workers.

August 2020, "HCWs of Color Twice as Likely as Whites to Get COVID-19", Lost on the Frontline, Kaiser Health News.

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